Another single-car crash

Several years ago, I saw a scene where a car had left the Ruta Interbalnearia  eastbound at high speed.

Today, another.

single car crash scene, Uruguay

single car crash scene, Uruguay

I was cruising the frontage road looking for a mechanic’s shop. Rather sobering, considering how many people I passed on foot or riding bicycles, not to mention the thought of a car flying off the highway into your vehicle.

What’s also interesting is how close this is to the crash in 2012.

crash locations, Uruguay

And the speed limit? Close as I can tell, 60 km/hr (36 mph). Maybe 90 (54). Either is clearly considerably less than this car was traveling.

 

Close call

A close call with a (not atypical) oblivious Uruguayan driver from Doug on Vimeo.

The best rule for driving in Uruguay is to try to watch every person and vehicle — pedestrians, bicyclists, motos, and other cars and trucks, constantly imagine the stupidest thing they could do — step into traffic, swerve in front of you without notice, run stop and yield signs — and plan for it.

In this case, I might have been distracted by the conversation and so didn’t see the approaching out the side window. Fortunately, the passenger’s field of view allowed her to see it before it cleared the A-column for my view, and warn me. Locals will recognize the voice 😉

When we bought this vehicle in 2010, the blind spot was one of the more pronounced criticisms I could find online.

meriva-a-pillar

The triangle caused by the A-pillar split should be helpful, but since my eye level is near the top, it provides no help. Still, I have most often had problems with the passenger side, so perhaps I had a lapse of attention.

Which — when driving in Uruguay — can prove expensive, dangerous, or worse, as perhaps you can imagine.